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Colour Palettes Of The World’s Most Famous Royal Palaces: Here’s How To Give Your Home The Royal Treatment This Summer

There’s no denying the glamour and opulence that comes with a life of royalty, and with the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee being celebrated in June 2022, people all over the world will be immersing themselves in all things royal this summer.

So, we wanted to find out which of the world’s royal palaces are loved the most, and then discover the unique colour palettes from each palace’s interior to create a beautiful piece of inspiration for anyone who’d like recreate a royal inspired interior in their own home.

From the burnt orange and opulent blue shades of Hampton Court Palace in the UK, to the mesmerising and unmistakable red and gold hues of the Forbidden City in China, read on to see the unique colour palette of the 10 most loved royal palaces in the world.

If your next renovation or redecoration project involves a complete redesign, or you’re keen for a smaller project like updating your roof windows, adding extra insulation or building a shed fit for royalty – this interior design guide should be the perfect inspiration.

The Top 50 Most Popular Palaces In The World

To find out which palaces the world is Googling and visiting the most, we analysed both search data and Instagram hashtag data – we then combined both data points to give each royal residence a ‘palace popularity score’ for hundreds of royal palaces around the world to reveal the top 50 most popular palaces of 2022.

The UK’s Buckingham Palace takes the top spot as the world’s most popular royal abode with a popularity score of almost 8 million, thanks to 6.6 million annual global searches for the palace and over 1.3 million hashtags on Instagram for the Queen’s most famous residence.

Three other UK palaces feature in the top 10, and nine UK palaces feature in the top 50 overall. Windsor Castle and Kensington Palace take second and third place, with popularity scores of between 2.4 million and 5.9 million. Hampton Court Palace, Eltham Palace and Holyrood Palace all feature in the top 20, showing just how much the world loves the UK royals and their regal residences.

European countries France and Italy also dominate the top 50 most popular palaces, with eight Italian palaces and seven French palaces making the list. One of France’s most beautiful and well-known palaces, The Palace of Versailles ranks in fourth position with over 178,000 social media hashtags and almost two million global Google searches a year for the stately home.

Château De Chambord, located in Chambord and known for its distinctive French Renaissance architecture, places just outside the top ten in position 11, while Château De Blois and Château D’Amboise rank in positions 24 and 27 respectively.

If it’s some Italian royal glamour you’re after, Italy is certainly not in short supply, with eight of the top 50 palaces located in the Mediterranean country. Many of the palaces in Italy are a remnant of Palazzo style architecture, which was used by wealthy families of the Italian Renaissance. The Pitti Palace (or Palazzo Pitti) is one such example of this gorgeous architecture in action, so it’s no wonder that the palace ranks in the top ten most popular palaces, with a popularity score of 833,859.

Royal residences across Europe and in other countries including India and China also rank in the top 20, highlighting the huge range of stunning royal homes across the world. Whether you’re visiting to learn about the history of former residents, gawp at the architectural beauty, or simply get inspired for your next home renovation project, each definitely represent some of the finest architecture on the planet.

Rank

Palace

Country

Annual Searches

Instagram Hashtags

Popularity Score

1

Buckingham Palace

UK

6,600,000

1,379,089

7,979,089

2

Windsor Castle

UK

5,400,000

409,689

5,809,689

3

Kensington Palace

UK

1,980,000

425,613

2,405,613

4

Palace Of

Versailles

France

1,980,000

178,381

2,158,381

5

Mysore Palace

India

1,620,000

202,218

1,822,218

6

Forbidden City

China

1,086,000

364,818

1,450,818

7

Hampton Court

Palace

UK

888,000

155,972

1,043,972

8

Prague Castle

Czech Republic

397,200

581,312

978,512

9

Pitti Palace

Italy

726,000

107,859

833,859

10

Dublin Castle

Ireland

486,000

87,441

573,441

11

Château De

Chambord

France

486,000

79,064

565,064

12

Buda Castle

Hungary

325,200

198,976

524,176

13

Umaid Bhawan Palace

India

486,000

36,315

522,315

14

Falaknuma Palace

India

486,000

18,486

504,486

15

Palazzo Reale

Italy

266,400

207,458

473,858

16

Chowmahalla

Palace

India

397,200

23,107

420,307

17

Eltham Palace

UK

397,200

19,652

416,852

18

Peleș Castle

Romania

325,200

60,626

385,826

19

Holyrood Palace

UK

325,200

39,165

364,365

20

Pena Palace

Portugal

217,200

141,379

358,579

21

Potala Palace

China

325,200

31,952

357,152

22

Istana Negara

Malaysia

266,400

86,964

353,364

23

Topkapı Palace

Turkey

145,200

192,211

337,411

24

Château De Blois

France

266,400

11,748

278,148

25

St James's Palace

UK

266,400

8,323

274,723

26

Castel Sant Elmo

Italy

217,200

41,664

258,864

27

Château D Amboise

France

217,200

11,932

229,132

28

Hillsborough

Castle

UK

217,200

4,924

222,124

29

Casina

Vanvitelliana

Italy

177,600

27,765

205,365

30

Linlithgow Palace

UK

177,600

20,854

198,454

31

Tokyo Imperial

Palace

Japan

177,600

17,942

195,542

32

Palazzo Dei

Normanni

Italy

177,600

16,967

194,567

33

Padmanabhapuram

Palace

India

177,600

4,140

181,740

34

Belvedere Palace

Austria

118,800

58,336

177,136

35

Dolmabahçe Palace

Turkey

118,800

45,949

164,749

36

Hofburg Palace

Austria

97,200

52,457

149,657

37

Lalbagh Fort

Bangladesh

145,200

3,188

148,388

38

Ahsan Manzil

Bangladesh

145,200

2,541

147,741

39

Nymphenburg Palace

Germany

118,800

27,840

146,640

40

Peterhof Palace

Russia

97,200

33,818

131,018

41

Shuri Castle

Japan

97,200

30,260

127,460

42

Istana Nurul

Iman

Brunei

118,800

6,548

125,348

43

Château De Rambouillet

France

118,800

6,121

124,921

44

Hill Palace

India

118,800

5,018

123,818

45

Sultan's Palace

Tanzania

118,800

3,635

122,435

46

Ming Palace

China

118,800

1,699

120,499

47

Castello Ursino

Italy

97,200

14,043

111,243

48

Palazzo

Carignansearo

Italy

97,200

13,226

110,426

49

Château De
Saint Germain En Laye

France

97,200

3,126

100,326

50

Castello Del

Valentino

Italy

79,200

17,278

96,478

The Colour Palettes Of The Ten Most Popular Palaces In The World

If you’re feeling inspired to incorporate a noble nod to the iconic royal style in your next decorating or renovation project, we’ve created a unique colour palette for each of the ten most popular palaces in the world.

From royal reds to glamorous golds, there are plenty of shades, colours and architectural styles you can incorporate into your home to transform any room into a space fit for royalty.

1. Buckingham Palace, UK

This incredible building has been the official London home of UK’s sovereigns since 1837, and in 2022 is the administrative headquarters of the Monarch. More than 50,000 people visit the palace every year, with the building acting as a venue for many royal events, ceremonies and of course, garden parties.

The UK palace has 775 rooms, including 52 bedrooms, 78 bathrooms, a ballroom, music room and throne room. The stately building has 760 windows which are reported to be cleaned every six weeks to keep them sparkling, and the whole palace measures 108m (354 ft) by 120 m (390 ft), reaches a height of 24 m (79 ft), and contains more than 77,000 sq. m (830,000 sq. ft) of floorspace.

Colour scheme

The interior consists of styles including baroque, rococo and a range of 19th century finishes. Perhaps one of the most classically royal colour schemes, Buckingham Palace’s Grand Ballroom is a celebration of deep reds and vibrant golds. It’s the largest of the state rooms at Buckingham Palace and today the impressive room is used for official functions including investitures and state banquets. The ivory walls offset the bold colours and the opulent orangery gold colours can be seen in a variety of shades. Alongside the luxurious rich hues, there’s also just a smidge of a beautiful muted grey blue in the incredible painting hanging centrally on the main wall which contrasts beautifully with the commanding red tones.

2. Windsor Castle, UK

Ranking in second position, and just 20 miles west of Buckingham Palace, is Windsor Castle with a score of 5,809,689. The oldest and largest occupied castle in the world, it has over 1,000 rooms and even a chapel located in the grounds.

Built in 1066, William the Conqueror was the king who first chose the site for the castle – high above the Thames and on the edge of a Saxon hunting ground. The castle took 16 years to build, and the castle grounds stretch over 52,069 square metres (or 13 acres). The Castle was rebuilt by Charles II with the help of architect Hugh May in 1660, creating a set of extravagant Baroque interiors throughout the palace.

Colour scheme

Inside the extravagant Green Drawing Room at Windsor Castle, there’s an explosion of glorious gold, complimented by a variety of sumptuous green tones – from a bright emerald green on the chairs to a dark racing green on the walls. Famously, this exquisite room was the backdrop for Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor’s christening photos with a décor masterminded by George IV, who took a personal interest in the decoration of the castle’s interiors.

3. Kensington Palace, UK

Rounding off the top three most popular palaces is Kensington Palace, which was built in 1065 in the grounds of Kensington Gardens in London, and was originally a mansion called Nottingham House.

The four-storey palace has 20 rooms, including five receptions and staff quarters. Kensington Palace was famously home to Princess Diana, and now Prince William and Kate live there, reportedly having spent £12 million on refurbishing their apartment. Areas of the palace, including the King’s State Apartments are open to the public, with the rooms being open to visitors.

Colour scheme

Inside the Cupola Room in Kensington Palace, we’re treated to a more subtle palette with delicate blue greys from the marble that punctuates the room, alongside a smattering of proud gold accents – with different shades seen on the statues, the chandeliers and the ceiling.

4. The Palace of Versailles, France

The fourth most popular palace in the world can be found in Versailles, France, and was originally built in 1634.

Today, the palace has over 2,300 rooms and is thought to have over 2,100 windows, 1,250 chimneys and 67 staircases. The building is a magnificent example of French Baroque architecture and is commonly thought of as one of the most famous royal chateaus in France.

Colour scheme

Infamous for opulence, the Palace of Versailles is famed for its explosive extravagance, and The Hall Of Mirrors is no exception. When it comes to the specific colour scheme here though, it’s actually one of understated, muted and complimentary tones – from the beautiful golds to the dark and stormy greys in the ceiling, and the mauve accents in the marble on the walls. This unapologetically grand room was supposedly designed to communicate the power of Louis XIV and it’s hosted a number of historic events, from the proclamation of the German empire to the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.

5. Mysore Palace, India

Mysore Palace spreads over 72 acres and the current structure was designed by Henry Irwin in 1912. It is India’s second most visited tourist attraction after the Taj Mahal, with more than 8 million people visiting the palace every year, and ranks in as fifth most popular palace in our research.

Also called the Amba Vilas Palace, the stately home is one of the most magnificent and largest palaces in India, built in the Indo-Saracenic style, with a hint of Hindu, Rajput and Gothic architectural styles. The interiors are opulently filled with stained class ceilings, sparkling chandeliers and works of art from all over the world.

Colour scheme

The colour scheme of the private durbar hall inside the palace is a vibrant celebration of colour, with golds, bright turquoises and deep pinks taking centre stage and singing together in bold harmony. The room is crowned with a ceiling of coloured glass which ensures the room and the bright colours within are always illuminated. 

6. Forbidden City, China

Located in Beijing, the Forbidden City was the Chinese imperial palace between 1420 and 1912 and served as home to 24 emperors during this time. The complex consists of 980 buildings, encompassing 8,886 rooms and covering 720,000 square metres (178 acres).

Central to Chinese power for five centuries, the Forbidden City and its iconic colour palette are a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with the architecture adhering to the Chinese geometric practice of feng shui.

Colour scheme

In China, red is a popular colour – it symbolizes luck, joy, happiness and is also believed to ward off evil. It’s also abundantly present inside the Hall Of Preserving Harmony in the Forbidden City alongside contrasting gold and sky blue accents.

7. Hampton Court Palace, UK

In seventh place is yet another UK palace – this time Hampton Court Palace, which is located in the London Borough of Richmond Upon Thames.

One of the most celebrated architectural features of this palace is the Hammerbeam Roof, which is often admired as an example of great craftsmanship. The hammerbeam style was chosen to evoke the great hall of medieval predecessors and the roof is the second largest example in the UK, detailed with ‘Eavesdroppers’ – carved and painted heads.

Colour scheme

Hampton Court Palace was famously the Baroque Georgian home to King Henry VIII and all of his six wives (not at the same time of course). The King’s Staircase is a grand entrance to the King’s state apartment and the frenzied walls were painted by William Kent. The colours are a celebration of burnt oranges and rich blues – from lighter grey blue tones to stormy muted blues. The staircase is an absolute masterpiece of interior design.

8. Prague Castle, Czech Republic

It is said that Prague Castle was founded in around 880 by Prince Bořivoj of the Premyslid Dynasty and it’s the largest coherent castle complex in the world, boasting a total area of almost 70,000 m2. The impressive castle is also the second UNESCO World Heritage Site in our top 10, consisting of ecclesiastical buildings of various architectural styles.

Colour scheme

One of the most understated and neutral colour palettes of the series, Prague Castle is a celebration of natural tones – the stone blocks provide a patchwork of different muted colours - from the darker greys in the pillars to the eucalyptus grey greens further down the St Vitus Cathedral. It’s a beautiful colour scheme that wouldn’t look out of place in any living room or kitchen.

9. Palazzo Pitti, Italy

Cosimo I de’Medici of the famous Medici family purchased Palazzo Pitti in 1550 and it is said to have some become the new symbol of the Medici’s power over Tuscany. Situated on the south side of the River Arno, the Pallazzo Pitti is a mainly renaissance palace and in the 18th century it was used as a power base for Napoleon. Now though, the palace is the largest museum complex in Florence, boasting 32,000 square meters.

Colour scheme

The Jupiter Room in the Palatine Gallery at Palazzo Pitti boasts an unrivalled collection of invaluable works of art, and it’s their lavish frames that set the stage for the palace’s colour scheme – yellowy golds and red orange walls, punctuated by the blacks, blues and greys in the paintings. The enormous palace is one of Florence’s largest architectural monuments, originally built in 1458 and most of the current internal decoration was designed in the 17th century.

10. Dublin Castle, Ireland

Rounding off the top 10 list of the world’s most famous royal palaces, is Ireland’s Dublin Castle. Built in the thirteenth century on the site of a Viking settlement, the Irish castle served as the headquarters of the English administration and in 1922, following Ireland’s independence, it was handed over to the Irish Government.

The castle was of typical Norman courtyard design with a central square without a keep and bounded on all sides by defensive walls. Situated on the south east of Norman Dublin, the castle originally formed one corner of the outer permitter of the whole city.  

Colour scheme

Here we see a palette of emerald greens and regal reds complimented by dark orangey gold in the frames of the paintings on the wall. Alongside the pale colours from the ivory walls and marble pillars, the room’s dominate colour is green – with a light sage tone on the ceiling and a bright and bold carpet with multiple shades of green on the floor. This could be a tricky colour scheme to pull off in a traditional home, but in a royal palace it commands elegance.  

So whether you’re looking to build a conservatory perfect for a spot of afternoon tea, a gazebo to host your next royal gathering, or a simple extension to make your home feel a little more palace-like, we’ve got everything you need for your next royal renovation.